ANDY CONTRIBUTES TO HARKIVE

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Andy was asked to contribute to Harkive, an annual, online music research project that gathers stories from people around the world about how, where and why they listened to music on a single day. Since launching in 2013, the project has gathered over 8,000 stories, creating a unique snapshot of the many listening cultures, habits and practices that exist on that day with the resulting analysis leading to a useful, informative and interesting resource for anyone interested in Popular Music.

You can read his contribution here.

WHY I NEED TO PAY FOR MORE FOR MUSIC

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The single greatest failure of the music industry in my lifetime was its inability to convince people that £15 for an album wasn’t expensive. Imagine someone giving you a pint glass, charging you £15 and saying you could refill it with beer as often as you liked for the rest of your life. That’s as close as I can get to articulating music’s worth to me.  Continue Reading →

THE ART OF BALANCE, ON INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

I was asked to contribute to Walk The Talk; a seminar addressing the lack of gender equality in the music industry, hosted by Balansekunst. I couldn’t attend in person, so recorded this monologue which was used to open proceedings on the day, at the by:Larm Festival and Conference in Oslo
#IWD2016

WITH ARTIST VISAS, THE FOG OF WAR OBSCURES THE LANDSCAPE

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The UK music industry is up in arms about the cost of Visas that enable artists and their crew to travel to the U.S. to play shows. They’ve been up in arms for a while, and there are conversations going on between representatives of the Musicians’ Union and U.S. Homeland Security. I hope these conversations bear fruit, and that the cost of US Work Visas is greatly reduced.

Actually, that’s not true.

I don’t care. Continue Reading →

A WINDOW INTO LIFE ON THE ROAD WITH EAST INDIA YOUTH

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Ahead of my full-day lecture on Tour Management at University of Westminster, London, for Music TankThe Line of Best Fit asked me to write about my touring experiences, so I managed to find a link between gelato and a near-death experience in Sicily. Read it here

INTERVIEW WITH BUCHAREST’S INERTIA MOVEMENT

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The good Andrei Bucureci at Inertia Movement interviewed me when I was in Bucharest with East India Youth in October. Read it here

HOW WE MOVE

BERLIN, TUESDAY 28 JULY 2015 Continue Reading →

THE GREAT NORTH AMERICAN: A DIARY FROM THE ROAD

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I toured through North America with the artist I manage and tour manage – East India Youth (William Doyle) – and our sound engineer George Hider. This is what happened

Continue Reading →

MUSIC VENUE TRUST UNVEIL DETAILED REPORT INTO SMALL VENUES

The Music Venue Trust – a charity founded in 2014 to preserve, secure and improve the UK’s network of small to medium scale (mostly independently run) music venues – hosted Venues Day in London at the end of last year. Over 120 venues from across the UK attended, to put their heads together to see how they could improve their lot. They’ve produced a report called Understanding Small Music Venues. You can read it here. If you haven’t got time and you don’t mind if I shamelessly spin it to fit my agenda, here’s my overview: Continue Reading →

THE DISTANCE BETWEEN US: HOW MAINLAND EUROPEAN FESTIVALS TROUNCE THEIR UK COUNTERPARTS

[Above: a pictorial metaphor for my gratitude and respect for those festival production crews who treat artists and their crew with courtesy and respect] Continue Reading →

NOTES FROM THE CONTINENT: the hopes and dreams of a Tour Manager

I write from the road with Savages as we journey around mainland Europe, through France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, Poland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands. What follows will omit any incriminating details, but will aim to illuminate a little of what it is a tour manager does. Continue Reading →

Andy Inglis wades into the ‘why do the U.K’s small venues suck’ debate. Again

It’s not all small venues, of course. That point sometimes gets lost, or wilfully ignored. Continue Reading →

Guest list: a plague on all our houses

[Illustration by Jake Parker]

I wrote about this in May 2012. It needs to be said again.

From time to time an article appears in the national press, lamenting the demise of the UK’s grassroots live music venues, usually prompted by the closure of one, and ignoring the opening of at least one to replace it. The Guardian ran one last year, and they pretty much reprised it the other dayContinue Reading →

“£200-worth of food and drink AND eight £15 buy-outs? Fuck off”

CMU asked Andy (I should probably stop referring to myself in the third person) some questions about his background, recent history, and what he thinks of the live music industry in the UK.

This is what happened: Continue Reading →

10 years after the Station Nightclub disaster, have we learned nothing?

“People went to the bathrooms looking for windows, they fell unconscious, then others crawled on top of them to get to the windows” Continue Reading →

An order to dance: on the road with Savages


It’s been a while since I wrote from the road, and I’ve been prompted by my friend, colleague and gentleman Matt Farrar‘s photography. Continue Reading →

Wanted: nine million affluent gig-goers

Just the other day The Live Music Act became law in England and Wales, which ushered in the deregulation of live performance in rooms of no more than 200 people. I’ve followed its progress for some time, attended debates on it, and been invited to give my perspective on it. I don’t claim to understand every word (it’s a piece of legislation and my mind doesn’t effortlessly wrap itself around legalese), but I know enough about it to risk writing about it on a public website, and I’d suggest I know more about running a small venue than most, if not all, of the architects and supporters of the Act.

Continue Reading →

Beat Surrender? The grass-roots live music industry is self-harming

On Satuday 26 May The Guardian ran an article (printed in The Observer the next day) titled ‘Beat Surrender: why the heart of British rock music is under threat. Across the country iconic venues where the top bands learned their trade are shutting down as rent rises and falling audiences spell crisis for promoters and future stars‘. Continue Reading →